Stage 4: Cogenhoe to Yardley Hastings

The ‘Needs to Know’

Distance: 3.5 miles (5.63km)

Time to walk: Quite hilly so about 1 hour 20 minutes

Difficulty: Mostly across country paths & fields. There are patches that can get very muddy after wet weather

Parking: On street in Cogenhoe, but as this is a linear walk you’ll need a lift back, if not doing as part of The Northamptonshire Round

Public toilets: Cogenhoe Holiday Park, The Red Lion Cogenhoe, either of the two pubs in Yardley Hastings – Red Lion or The Rose & Crown

Map of the route: @ Ten Foot Club

map

Stage 4 of The Northamptonshire Round & is quite a hilly one. We’ve walked it before as part of a circular walk in the opposite direction so knew what we were in for

It was a baking hot day in June 2015 & this stage was part of 3 that day – some 13 miles!

So…Let’s Walk!

1. This walk starts where Stage 3 finished…Cogenhoe Holiday Park. From there follow the lane out of the Park & up the steep hill to the top. When the road bends right & into the village head through the gate ahead into the meadow…

IMG_17632. Stick to the left hedge, but ignore the footpath signs showing paths going off left & keep straight…

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3. After passing the crown of the hill, look for a gap on the left leading across a field down to the road…

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At the bottom, cross the bridge & road & into the next field…

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We're on the right path & let's hope the next few stretches are better signed than the previous one!

We’re on the right path & let’s hope the next few stretches are better signed than the previous one!

4. Ready for a steep climb? Stick to the left hedge again then, put the head down & crack on! IMG_1769

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Don't forget - some of the best views are behind you! Looking back to Cogenhoe

Don’t forget – some of the best views are behind you! Looking back to Cogenhoe

5. When the field levels out, look for a large tree across to the right containing a flight of steps…

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6. At the top of the steep steps turn sharp left through the gate…

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There’s something about ‘keeping the hedge on the left’ today but, at the moment that’s whats required…

Lots of wild flowers

Lots of wild flowers

Eventually the track bends right & then left & we’re then looking for a footpath post on the left…

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There it is!

There it is!

7. Be careful, but now head down the steep steps back into the valley we left earlier…

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…& follow the narrow path through the undergrowth & up the steep slope into the open once more

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8. Follow the track across the next field & down into what, when we first did this walk, we called a ‘magical little dell…

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Stand on the bridge awhile & watch how the playful stream tumbles through…

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9. Climb up the slope, turn right & follow the track up the hill to the Whiston Road…

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Whiston Church in the distance

Whiston Church in the distance

10. Be careful crossing the road…

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…& then keep the hedge on the left once more- this area’s a fabulous Sloe picking area…shhh!

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11. At the top of the hill the path turns into a copse &, in winter, this is an extremely boggy area..

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Still boggy on hot days!

Still boggy on hot days!

12. Exit the copse & descend the hill with views across to Castle Ashby on the left…

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…& on reaching the farm buildings turn right along the hard track…

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Cant believe the conkers are forming already!

Cant believe the conkers are forming already!

13. Follow the road down the hill & then up again into the beautiful hamlet of Chadstone…

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Chadstone consists of very few properties, but they’re all pretty exclusive, including the imposing Rectory…

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The Rectory

The Rectory

14. At the top of the lane’s the T-junction with the Castle Ashby Road & looking straight ahead is a footpath marker leading through a gate into the field…

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15. Another kind farmer who’s clearly marked where we need to walk…

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The path crosses a bridge near the trees above & into a meadow which, when we were there, was a mass of buttercups…

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16. Look for a stile on the right when reaching the fence…

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…& on crossing, we’re now in the Castle Ashby Estate. Better stick to the marked path here which heads diagonally right towards the grand main driveway to the house

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17. Cross the drive & walk across to the fence on the other side. Follow this away from the house looking for a rather rickety stile into the next field…

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It’s an easy walk from here down into Yardley Hastings & yet again keep the hedge on your left…

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18. At the bottom of the field follow the path round to the right to come to an iron gate on the left…

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Pass through into the field & cross straight towards the telegraph poles…

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19. After going through the gate ignore the path on the left & take the right hand one through the bushes & out into Yardley Hastings…

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Follow the road to the left – Yardley Hastings really is a lovely village, until reaching the High Street

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Hastings is the surname of the Earls of Pembroke & it distinguishes the village from nearby Yardley Gobion

Thomas Dudley was born in Yardley Hastings in 1576. He sailed to New England on the Arbella in 1630 & became Governor of the Massachusetts Bay colony. He signed the charter of Harvard College in 1650

Bouttoll Downing was born in Yardley Hastings in 1510. Ten generations later in 1820 “his descendant Sarah Downing” married John Abbey in Yardley Hastings where further generations continued to live

There’s a great bench under a tree on the green which seems an ideal place to stop as we’ve now completed this leg of ‘The Round’. 

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Well Stage 3, whilst hilly, was far better marked than the previous ones we’ve walked so far

We’ll start the next stage from the bench as there’s quite a bit more of Yardley Hastings to see before we leave the village. So until the next stage…

Go Walk!

 

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